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Claremont EAP is Here to Help

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Claremont EAP is Here to Help

The recent shootings in Atlanta and Boulder remind us that all too often we are faced with trauma, acts of terrorism, gun violence, racism, hate crimes, and other tragic events. When faced with these situations, our needs are physical, emotional, and psychological in nature. In addition, those responding to and providing services, care, and support often experience fatigue, emotional distress, and exhaustion.

Claremont EAP is an important resource during difficult times.  You and your family members in the immediate household can receive free and confidential mental health support for issues such as depression, anxiety, stress, and grief.  Call Claremont EAP at 800-834-3773 to access your benefit.

The effect of a traumatic event goes far beyond its immediate devastation. It takes time to grieve and rebuild our lives. The COVID pandemic has already challenged us in many ways.  Life may not return to normal for a long time.  A traumatic event can cause changes in living conditions and day-to-day activities, leading to strains in relationships, changes in expectations, and shifts in responsibilities. These disruptions in relationships, roles, and routines can make life unfamiliar or unpredictable.

Here are some guidelines to help build resilience when experiencing trauma.

Things to Remember:

  • It is normal to feel anxious about the safety of you and your family.
  • Profound sadness, grief, and anger are normal reactions to a tragic event.
  • Acknowledging our feelings helps us recover.
  • Focusing on your strengths and abilities will help you to heal.
  • Accepting help from community programs and resources is healthy.
  • We each have different needs and different ways of coping.
  • It is common to want to strike back at people who have caused great pain. However, nothing good is accomplished by hateful language or actions.

Signs that Assistance Is Needed

  • Disorientation or confusion and difficulty communicating thoughts.
  • Limited attention span and difficulty concentrating.
  • Becoming easily frustrated.
  • Overwhelming guilt and self-doubt.
  • Depression, sadness, and feelings of hopelessness.
  • Mood swings and crying easily.
  • Difficulty maintaining balance.
  • Headaches/stomach problems.
  • Tunnel vision/muffled hearing.
  • Disorientation or confusion and difficulty communicating thoughts.
  • Limited attention span and difficulty concentrating.
  • Becoming easily frustrated.
  • Overwhelming guilt and self-doubt.
  • Depression, sadness, and feelings of hopelessness.
  • Mood swings and crying easily.
  • Difficulty maintaining balance.
  • Headaches/stomach problems.
  • Tunnel vision/muffled hearing.
  • Colds or flu-like symptoms.
  • Difficulty sleeping.
  • Poor work performance.
  • Reluctance to leave home.
  • Fear of crowds, strangers, or being alone.
  • Increased use of drugs/alcohol.

Ways to Ease the Stress

  • Talk with someone about your feelings (anger, sorrow, and other emotions) even though it may be difficult.
  • Don't hold yourself responsible for the disastrous event or be frustrated because you feel that you cannot help directly in the rescue work.
  • Take steps to promote your own physical and emotional healing by staying active in your daily life patterns or by adjusting them. A healthy approach to life (e.g., healthy eating, rest, exercise, relaxation, meditation) will help both you and your family.
  • Maintain regular household and daily routines, limiting demanding responsibilities of yourself and your family.
  • Spend time with family and friends, even on Zoom.
  • Participate in memorials, rituals, and the use of symbols as a way to express feelings.
  • Use existing supports groups of family, friends, and spiritual/religious outlets.
  • Establish a family emergency plan. It can be comforting to know that there is something you can do.

A disaster or traumatic event can have far-reaching effects in major areas of our lives, making rebuilding our emotional lives extremely difficult. However, sometimes just knowing what to expect can help ease the transition back to a normal life. As you and your family begin to rebuild your lives, you may face any or all of the situations described below.

Personal Uncertainties

  • Feeling mentally drained and physically exhausted is normal and common.
  • The loss of a home, business, or income may result in displacement and confusion about the future.
  • Unresolved emotional issues or pre-existing problems and previous losses may resurface.
  • Anniversaries of the disaster or traumatic event remind us of our losses. This reaction may be triggered by the event date each month and may be especially strong on the yearly anniversary of the event.

If you or a member of your family is having trouble coping, ask for help. Call Claremont EAP at 800-834-3773 to access your free and confidential services. 

Source:  Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

 

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